Russian Communist-Era Art Form, which Emerged in the 1920s, Withers Away

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PALEKH, RUSSIA (AP)- A squirrel tail. Wolf teeth. Sheets of gold. Flax oil. These are the things Vladimir Buldakov uses to work a feat of modern-day alchemy: transforming an ordinary papier-mache box into a gilded miniature masterpiece that will tell the story of saints or heroes, fairies or dragons. Buldakov comes from Palekh, a 700-year-old Russian village where a church’s lavender onion-domes overlook snow-clad houses, a frozen river and a distant birch forest. The town is famous for its beauty, but the rare outsiders who visit come for the varnished boxes that bear its name. Now, the unique art form, which emerged in the 1920s after the atheist Bolsheviks approved a new medium in which masters of religious icon paintings could use their talents, is struggling to find a reason to exist in capitalist society. If it disappears entirely, its stunted lifespan will bear vivid testament