Last of Frank Lloyd Wright-Trained Architects, Edgar Tafel, Dies in New York at Age 98

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NEW YORK, NY (AP).- New York City architect Edgar Tafel, an original Taliesin fellow credited with saving some of Frank Lloyd Wright’s most important works, has died. He was 98. Tafel, who was instrumental in helping save two historic interiors from a house designed by his celebrated mentor in Minnesota, died Jan. 18 at his home in lower Manhattan, said Robert Silman, a longtime friend and New York structural engineer. He was the last surviving member of the original Taliesin fellows, a community of young apprentice architects established in 1932 at Wright’s home and school in Spring Green, Wis., Silman said. He had a hand in two of Wright’s most enduring structures: Fallingwater on Bear Run creek in southwest Pennsylvania and the Johnson Wax Building in Racine, Wis. In his own practice, which Tafel opened in New York after World War II, he was perhaps best known for designing the Church House for the First Presbyterian Church, a 19th-century landmark in Greenwich Village.