Tate Britain explores how British Art has been shaped by Migration

artwork: James Tissot - "Portsmouth Dockyard" c.1877, Oil on canvas  © Tate. -  On view at Tate Britain presents an exhibition exploring how British art has been shaped by migration.


LONDON.- In January Tate Britain presents an exhibition exploring how British art has been shaped by migration. Featuring artists from Van Dyck, Whistler and Mondrian to Steve McQueen and Francis Alÿs, Migrations traces not only the movement of artists, but the circulation of art and ideas. Beginning with works from the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, the exhibition will show that much British art from this period was made by artists from abroad, including Antwerp-born Anthony Van Dyck, the court painter whose famous portraits such as Charles I 1636 (The Chequers Trust) have come to shape our perceptions of the British aristocracy of this time. It also explores the establishment of the Royal Academy, with works by the Swiss-Austrian Angelica Kaufmann, the Anglo-American Benjamin West and others who were fundamental to its foundation in 1768. On exhibition 31st January through 12th August.